Warning: include_once(/var/sites/n/nsrlive.co.uk/public_html//wp-includes/init.php) [function.include-once]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /var/sites/n/nsrlive.co.uk/public_html/wp-config.php on line 88

Warning: include_once() [function.include]: Failed opening '/var/sites/n/nsrlive.co.uk/public_html//wp-includes/init.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/lib/php') in /var/sites/n/nsrlive.co.uk/public_html/wp-config.php on line 88
Art – Newcastle Student Radio

Art Review: Laing Gallery Laura knight Portraits

 

This exhibition at the Laing featuring Laura knight’s Portraits is well worth a visit. It completely exceeded my expectations with a wide array of impressive subject matter spanning the pioneering 20th century artists career. Dame Laura knight was celebrated in her lifetime and had a very long successful career. The exhibition brings together Knights tender portraits of her gypsy friends as well as those works inspired by ballet and theatre.

The exhibition organised by the National Portrait Gallery has been carefully split into three sections following her works chronologically and starting off with her early work in Cornwall. The first room also has her studies of gypsies, sildenafil hospital patience, rx circus performers and dancers. These were amongst some of my favourite spanning a variety of subject matter but also styles with a large very impressionistic painting to the right as soon as you walk in, rather reminiscent of the likes of Van Gogh with her brush marks. This was quite different to her ‘usual’ style that has a much smoother application of paint. There was also some studies of segregated patients in an American hospital, these tender portraits appeared surprisingly modern.

The next room featured large paintings documenting the war such as ‘The Dock, Nuremberg’ where she documented the Nuremberg trial. Knight was a highly gifted painter, largely using oils and her successful career did much for gaining recognition for women in the creative arts, yet another reason why this exhibition was so refreshing! The final room included some work by her husband Harold who had a much more impressionistic style with a soft romantic quality beautifully capturing light in fleeting moments. For me knight seemed completely ahead of her time, I really was surprised to see how early her paintings dated, born in 1877 she worked right up until 1970 aged 93!! The paintings that stood out especially for me are those in the first room, the more traditional study of a nude and self-portrait as well as the paintings of black subjects in the hospital. It only costs four pounds and you can come back as many times as you like that day, I would highly recommend a visit before it ends!!

Running from 2 November to 16th February.

Alice Craigie

Hatton Gallery Current exhibition reviews

Marilyn Monroe: A British love Affair. 25th January-17th May 2014

This is a delightful little exhibition right in the heart of campus in Newcastle’s Hatton Gallery. The exhibition features a selection of magazines and photographs of Marilyn through out her career as portrayed to the British public. Though the exhibition is rather small (only one room) it is well worth a visit, viagra giving an intimate insight into the actress, physician model, tadalafil and singers career between 1947 too only months before her death in 1962. Monroe was one of the worlds most popular and famous pin ups, the exhibition shows an endearing trace into the very early photo-shoots right through to the more iconic Marilyn that most of us would be familiar with. Featuring an array of not only photographs and magazine covers but also film posters and newspapers, no doubt there is something unfamiliar for each visitor to see and a new side of Marilyn to uncover. One of my favourite images shows Marilyn mid kicking a football, I left wanting to see more and even feeling a little frustrated you couldn’t open the magazines to get the whole story! This exhibition would appeal no matter what prior knowledge you have of Monroe, she was utterly captivating to her audience through out her career and this display is certainly not lacking in charm.

BKRjjwgCUAAO7R2

Markus Kartieb and William Cobbing.

As you walk into the Hatton you are greeted immediately with a display of sculpture works by the artists Markus Karstieb and William Cobbing. The exhibition is a display of work produced during a yearlong residency with the Newcastle Fine Art Department. Their work though not collaborative, works very well with each other as both artists are concerned with sculpture and most notably ceramics. The display is quite striking with several large ceramic

sculptures that almost act as little divides within the room. There are also smaller pieces on the floor that look almost like a metal box with a smooth exterior but has a very textured and physical inside; they each have a beautiful glassy depth to the base. Both artists have very tactile techniques creating marks using their hands using their own physical limits resulting in strange shapes that all relate to our own physicality, ie squeezing the clay with his hands. The works have been glazed with a variety of finishes and are really quite stunning objects. Markus’s work is on display till the 15th of March and William Cobbings till May- I would definitely recommend a look around!

markus

Eduardo Paolozzi’s Bunk!  25 January-17 may 2014-02-10

This exhibition features the work of Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi who’s work is often regarded as a pre cursor to pop art, or indeed very early explorations into the movement. Paolozzi created these early experiments into pop art using images from magazines, the display features a number of collages which frankly are an unusual collection of the mildly humorous and completely bizarre. I have to say I found it somewhat disappointing compared to other current exhibitions on at the Hatton, it failed to grip my attention in quite the same way. In another smaller adjoining room there is an exhibition of contemporary artists called ‘Pre-pop to Post-Human: Collage in the digital age’ 25 january-17th may 2014. This features the works of fifteen artists who were commissioned to created work in response to Eduardo’s technique and approach to collage. The collages portray strange juxtapositions and garish colour, it is interesting to see a very current response to Paolozzi’s work. Again this is worth a visit if you are in the Hatton for the Monroe but a little disappointing in comparison.

bunk

 

 

Alice Craigie

 

 

 

Baltic: Thomas Scheibitz. ‘ONE-Time Pad’

Thomas Scheibitz is a German artist, viagra sale born in 1968 and he studied at the Art Academy in Dresden where he developed his signature visual language. Scheibitz creates work across a variety of media but most are concerned with the formality of geometric shapes, no rx vivid colour and a continual play between figuration and abstraction. Scheibitz tends to seek his inspiration from assorted found objects, which feature in the exhibition; he has deliberately painted some of them yellow so that the colour of the object less easily distracts from its formal quality’s. Thomas Scheibitz’s work also references themes in the everyday and he draws from a wide range of motifs; from film, literature and design to the great renaissance masters. This exhibition is a showcase of over two hundred works by the artist over the last five years, and is spread across two floors in the Baltic. The lower level, is mainly large scale paintings but also an archive of found objects taken directly from the artists studio in Berlin. Whilst the upper level contains a more eclectic mix of pieces and covered more of the artists process behind the works with a room full of preparatory drawings. I really enjoyed the exhibition and found it quite engaging, especially Scheibitz sculptures out of cardboard which were highly glossed and gave the illusion of wood and dense materiality. I was less impressed with the paintings, however this could be to do with my irrational prejudice towards all things ‘Neon’ in artwork. Nevertheless Scheibitz large scale works do have a striking quality about them, he paints a very shallow pictorial space with interlocking geometric forms that almost echo some kind of impossible jigsaw. Formally the paintings are quite interesting as Scheibitz uses a combination of traditional paints such as oils alongside household ‘B&Q purchases’ with even greater juxtaposition between rapid painterly marks and a carefully rendered almost graphic approach. Furthermore this flirtation between the figurative and the abstract in his work is interesting, and wholly subjective so defiantly take a trip so see what you make of it yourself!!

Review by Alice Craigie

https://www.balticmill.com/whats-on/exhibitions/detail/thomas-scheibitz

Eating healthy is essential for lifecycle

The term ‘minimalism’ is a trend from early 19th century and gradually became an important movement in response to the over decorated design of the previous period. Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York.

[dropcaps style=’square1′ background_color=”]T[/dropcaps]

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity. The structure’s beauty is also determined by playing with lighting, using the basic geometric shapes as outlines, using only a single shape or a small number of like shapes for components for design unity, using tasteful non-fussy bright color combinations, usually natural textures and colors, and clean and fine finishes.

[blockquote width=’100′]

USING SOMETIMES THE BEAUTY OF NATURAL PATTERNS ON STONE CLADDING AND REAL WOOD ENCAPSULATED WITHIN ORDERED SIMPLIFIED STRUCTURES, AND REAL METAL PRODUCING A SIMPLIFIED BUT PRESTIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN.

[/blockquote]

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight. This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

Another modern designer who exemplifies reductivist ideas is Luis Barragán. In minimalism, the architectural designers pay special attention to the connection between perfect planes, elegant lighting, and careful consideration of the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes from an architectural design. The more attractive looking minimalist home designs are not truly minimalist, because these use more expensive building materials and finishes, and are relatively larger.

Contemporary architects working in this tradition include John Pawson, Eduardo Souto de Moura, Álvaro Siza Vieira, Tadao Ando, Alberto Campo Baeza, Yoshio Taniguchi, Peter Zumthor, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Vincent Van Duysen, Claudio Silvestrin, Michael Gabellini, and Richard Gluckman.

 

Tracey Emin takes over New York again

The term ‘minimalism’ is a trend from early 19th century and gradually became an important movement in response to the over decorated design of the previous period. Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York.

[dropcaps style=’square1′ background_color=”]T[/dropcaps]

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity. The structure’s beauty is also determined by playing with lighting, using the basic geometric shapes as outlines, using only a single shape or a small number of like shapes for components for design unity, using tasteful non-fussy bright color combinations, usually natural textures and colors, and clean and fine finishes.

[blockquote width=’100′]

USING SOMETIMES THE BEAUTY OF NATURAL PATTERNS ON STONE CLADDING AND REAL WOOD ENCAPSULATED WITHIN ORDERED SIMPLIFIED STRUCTURES, AND REAL METAL PRODUCING A SIMPLIFIED BUT PRESTIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN.

[/blockquote]

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight. This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

Another modern designer who exemplifies reductivist ideas is Luis Barragán. In minimalism, the architectural designers pay special attention to the connection between perfect planes, elegant lighting, and careful consideration of the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes from an architectural design. The more attractive looking minimalist home designs are not truly minimalist, because these use more expensive building materials and finishes, and are relatively larger.

Contemporary architects working in this tradition include John Pawson, Eduardo Souto de Moura, Álvaro Siza Vieira, Tadao Ando, Alberto Campo Baeza, Yoshio Taniguchi, Peter Zumthor, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Vincent Van Duysen, Claudio Silvestrin, Michael Gabellini, and Richard Gluckman.

Sand garden of Ryoanji temple

The term ‘minimalism’ is a trend from early 19th century and gradually became an important movement in response to the over decorated design of the previous period. Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York.

[dropcaps style=’square1′ background_color=”]T[/dropcaps]

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity. The structure’s beauty is also determined by playing with lighting, using the basic geometric shapes as outlines, using only a single shape or a small number of like shapes for components for design unity, using tasteful non-fussy bright color combinations, usually natural textures and colors, and clean and fine finishes.

[blockquote width=’100′]

USING SOMETIMES THE BEAUTY OF NATURAL PATTERNS ON STONE CLADDING AND REAL WOOD ENCAPSULATED WITHIN ORDERED SIMPLIFIED STRUCTURES, AND REAL METAL PRODUCING A SIMPLIFIED BUT PRESTIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN.

[/blockquote]

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight. This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

Another modern designer who exemplifies reductivist ideas is Luis Barragán. In minimalism, the architectural designers pay special attention to the connection between perfect planes, elegant lighting, and careful consideration of the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes from an architectural design. The more attractive looking minimalist home designs are not truly minimalist, because these use more expensive building materials and finishes, and are relatively larger.

Contemporary architects working in this tradition include John Pawson, Eduardo Souto de Moura, Álvaro Siza Vieira, Tadao Ando, Alberto Campo Baeza, Yoshio Taniguchi, Peter Zumthor, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Vincent Van Duysen, Claudio Silvestrin, Michael Gabellini, and Richard Gluckman.

NSR Recommends…Light Surgeons: SuperEverything

 

For those after something a little bit different…

 

A mindblowing A/V kaleidoscopic portrait of the diverse cultural landscape of Malaysia.

 

Created by the UK’s leading audio-visual artists The Light Surgeons, look Super Everything brings together Malaysian musical and visual artists for a unique audio-visual collaboration. Exploded across multiple screens and speakers, cost combining a range of different media, this live cinema performance layers documentary footage and motion graphics with a original live electronic musical score.

 

Super Everything asks a timeless question about who we are as individuals and as a society. It is a exploration of our relationships with each other and our environment, and a survey of our everyday rituals that reveals what unites and divides us as human beings.

 

http://thesagegateshead.org/event/light-surgeons/

 

Kasper Sonne’s Belonging show to open in Munich

The term ‘minimalism’ is a trend from early 19th century and gradually became an important movement in response to the over decorated design of the previous period. Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York.

[dropcaps style=’square1′ background_color=”]T[/dropcaps]

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity. The structure’s beauty is also determined by playing with lighting, using the basic geometric shapes as outlines, using only a single shape or a small number of like shapes for components for design unity, using tasteful non-fussy bright color combinations, usually natural textures and colors, and clean and fine finishes.

[blockquote width=’100′]

USING SOMETIMES THE BEAUTY OF NATURAL PATTERNS ON STONE CLADDING AND REAL WOOD ENCAPSULATED WITHIN ORDERED SIMPLIFIED STRUCTURES, AND REAL METAL PRODUCING A SIMPLIFIED BUT PRESTIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN.

[/blockquote]

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight. This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

Another modern designer who exemplifies reductivist ideas is Luis Barragán. In minimalism, the architectural designers pay special attention to the connection between perfect planes, elegant lighting, and careful consideration of the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes from an architectural design. The more attractive looking minimalist home designs are not truly minimalist, because these use more expensive building materials and finishes, and are relatively larger.

Contemporary architects working in this tradition include John Pawson, Eduardo Souto de Moura, Álvaro Siza Vieira, Tadao Ando, Alberto Campo Baeza, Yoshio Taniguchi, Peter Zumthor, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Vincent Van Duysen, Claudio Silvestrin, Michael Gabellini, and Richard Gluckman.